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WOMEN'S HERSTORY MONTH


join us at the HoMA Doris Duke Theatre for the screenings of films that celebrate Women's Herstory Month!


To get your tickets go to: https://honolulumuseum.org/theatre/


Cléo from 5 to 7

Mar 2, 4, 11, & 31

Agnès Varda eloquently captures Paris in the sixties with this real-time portrait of a singer (Corinne Marchand) set adrift in the city as she awaits test results of a biopsy. A chronicle of the minutes of one woman’s life, Cléo from 5 to 7 is a spirited mix of vivid vérité and melodrama, featuring a score by Michel Legrand (The Umbrellas of Cherbourg) and cameos by Jean-Luc Godard and Anna Karina.


Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

Mar 3, 10, 18, & 24

A singular work in film history, Chantal Akerman’s Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles meticulously details, with a sense of impending doom, the daily routine of a middle-aged widow—whose chores include making the beds, cooking dinner for her son, and turning the occasional trick. In its enormous spareness, Akerman’s film seems simple, but it encompasses an entire world. Whether seen as an exacting character study or one of cinema’s most hypnotic and complete depictions of space and time, Jeanne Dielman is an astonishing, compelling movie experiment, one that has been analyzed and argued over for decades.


You Resemble Me

Mar 3, 4, 23, & 26

Cultural and intergenerational trauma erupt in this story about two sisters on the outskirts of Paris. After the siblings are torn apart, the eldest, Hasna, struggles to find her identity, leading to a choice that shocks the world. Director Dina Amer takes on one of the darkest issues of our time and deconstructs it in an intimate story about family, love, sisterhood, and belonging.


Daughters of the Dust

Mar 5, 24, & 25

Daughters of the Dust is a portrait of the women in the Peazant family, who belong to the creole Gullah culture—former slaves living in the Sea Islands who have been able to preserve much of their African cultural heritage. As they prepare to migrate, leaving their land and legacy for the promise of the North, conflict and struggles rise to the surface. It unfolds over the course of their final picnic in their current home; saturating the audience with impressionistic colors, African symbolism, Geechee-Gullah rituals, cooking, and dialect, all expressing the complex resonances of the Lowcountry lifestyle. Daughters of the Dust is a post-slavery narrative about cultural memory, notions of home and belonging, and conflicts of Black female identity.


Mary Cassatt: Painting the Modern Woman

Mar 9, 10, 12, 16, & Apr 2

Mary Cassatt made a career painting the lives of the women around her. Her radical images showed them as intellectual, curious and engaging, which was a major shift in the way women appeared in art. Presenting her astonishing prints, pastels and paintings, this film introduces us to the often-overlooked Impressionist whose own career was as full of contradiction as the women she painted.



Stonewalling (石門)

Mar 17, 18, 30 & Apr 2

20-year-old Lynn is told she needs English classes, flight attendant school, and a go-getter-attitude. She perseveres along this path of upward mobility until she finds out she’s pregnant. Indecisive and running out of time, she tells her boyfriend she’s had an abortion and instead returns to her feuding parents and their failing clinic to try and figure out, if she can, what's next.


Family Sunday: Wolfwalkers

Mar 19

In a time of superstition and magic, a young apprentice hunter, Robyn Goodfellowe, journeys to Ireland with her father to wipe out the last wolf pack. While exploring the forbidden lands outside the city walls, Robyn befriends a free-spirited girl, Mebh, a member of a mysterious tribe rumored to have the ability to transform into wolves by night. As they search for Mebh’s missing mother, Robyn uncovers a secret that draws her further into the enchanted world of the Wolfwalkers and risks turning into the very thing her father is tasked to destroy.


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